By Susan Feudale

Editor's note: When 6th-grade reading teacher Susan Feudale from Kiski Upper Elementary school in Apollo, Pennsylvania, cracks open Storyworks, her creative juices flow. You'll love the way she took our fiction story "The Good Deed" and developed an excellent writing extension activity that can be used with almost any story...

By Thomasine Mastrantoni and Deborah Goldstein, the Link Ladies

We are constantly asking students to share their thinking. We want a place for students to be able to reflect on what they are learning. In this app, students can use video to share their responses...

By Anna Starecheski

For Storyworks Jr.'s "One of a KIND" contest in the October/November issue, we asked students to describe a time they had trouble fitting in. This month's spotlight winner, Ransym W, was chosen as a winner because of her detailed, honest, and original essay.

By Anna Starecheski

One of my favorite parts of my job is managing student writing contests. On the Ideabook, we like to highlight extraordinary student writing through our Student Writer Spotlight. Our fantastic student writer for the Storyworks October/November issue is Danilo B! Danilo sent us an amazing entry to the Good Deed contest.

By Kara Corridan

We could talk about how much we love teachers all day. Luckily, Valentine's Day is the perfect opportunity to do just that! As we go about our jobs here at Storyworks and Storyworks Jr., we constantly ask ourselves: How can we make teachers' lives easier and more joyful? And one of our absolute favorite things is connecting with teachers and hearing all about what you do and how you do it...

By Allison Friedman

Storyworks’s February nonfiction feature will have your students on the edge of their seats. It tells the riveting story of two World War I ships that collided in Halifax Harbor in 1917, causing one of the most powerful explosions in history—a devastating blast that ripped through the Canadian towns of Halifax and Dartmouth. After reading about this shocking and little-known disaster, your students will no doubt be eager to learn more...