By Anna Starecheski

In February, we asked you to join our social media community at #MyStoryworksMoment to share your quintessential moments using Storyworks or Storyworks Jr in your classroom. We just love these visual connections that our subscribers are posting. It continues to inspire and amaze us to see your tweets - so keep them coming. Plus we love connecting with you on social media! Here are a few more of our favorites...

By Beth Orticelli

Editor's note: See how superstar second-grade teacher Beth O serves up a great curriculum tie-in to her science standards using our Paragraph Power article from the March/April issue of Storyworks Jr. It's about an incredible kid named Khloe, who took initiative to help homeless women in her community. Frankly, we never even thought that it could be connected to science! Take a look at this innovative way to use our Paragraph Power article and see if it can work for you.

By Allison Friedman

Storyworks’s most recent nonfiction feature will introduce your students to one of our favorite historical heroes: Robert Smalls. During the Civil War, desperate to free his family from slavery, Smalls risked his life to commandeer a Southern ship and steer it towards freedom. This thrilling story is a perfect jumping-off point to further learning about slavery in America and the Civil War. Here are a few resources to get you and your students started...

By Anna Starecheski

We are so excited about our trio of texts in the March/April issue of Storyworks Jr. We've got a nonfiction feature about a baby elephant who was rescued after her mother was killed by poachers, an informational text about how drones are being used to stop poaching, and a beautiful poem about humans' complicated relationship with elephants. We hope that these texts inspire your students to learn more about the problem of poaching, and we want to help you guide them on that journey. Here are four powerful extensions to keep the learning going on this complex topic...

By Kara Corridan

I'll be frank: The one part of Storyworks Jr. that gets the most mixed feedback is our poetry. For every teacher who tells us how grateful she is that we include poems in each issue, another tells us it's the part of Storyworks Jr. she uses the least. But we continue to include poems because we believe in their ability to present language and ideas in unique ways, and to help children explore their own voices and emotions. And then every once in a while we learn of the impact a particular poem has had on students, and we know we're on the right path. Here's one such story that deeply moved us.

By Kara Corridan

Want to meet a teacher who's taking Social/Emotional Learning to a whole new level? Introducing Anna Maria Montuori, a fourth-grade teacher in North Babylon, New York. This is her school's first year with a district-wide SEL program, and she's among the teachers who are embracing it wholeheartedly. She's been able to incorporate Storyworks into her initiatives, and we predict you'll be as inspired as we were when she described them to us.