By Allie Curtis and Shannon Seigler

Editor's note: Superstar coaches, Allie and Shannon, are back with another winner of an activity: Tabletop Twitter! As soon as you tell your students the name of this activity, we predict they'll be excited! This activity has students previewing text features while "tweeting" their thoughts, comments, and questions. It's fun for kids, and gets them thinking about the text before diving in for a first read. Check out how Mrs. Tiffany Spiva's fourth grade superstars rocked this strategy!  Let us know how it works in your classroom!

By Rebecca Leon

Here at Storyworks, we're always searching for ways to make our support offerings the best possible learning tools for your students. That's why I'm super excited to share with you our new-and-improved higher-level summarizing activity for our nonfiction and paired-text features. It's called  "Quick, Tell Me What Happened!"...

Looking for more ways to have your students test their writing chops? Direct them towards our contests! Interested in giving them a chance at the prize? These 8 tricks will definitely increase your chance of winning...

By Anna Starecheski

It's such a joy for all of us here at Storyworks and Storyworks Jr. to scroll through Twitter and see what you're up to. We love seeing the unique ways in which you teach with our magazines—often, you come up with ideas we never had in mind when we were gathering stories and creating support materials! We're constantly sending each other links to your tweets—"Did you see this?!" "Check out this idea!" "WOW!" Your creativity and passion are incredibly inspiring. Here are a few of our recent favorite tweets from you...

By Allison Friedman

Storyworks’s October/November nonfiction article is on a difficult but deeply important topic: the Syrian refugee crisis. It tells the moving story of two young brothers who leave war-torn Aleppo and make a new home in the United States. After reading the article, your students may have questions about the war in Syria, the plight of refugees, and what they can do to help. Here are four resources that you can use to continue the conversation...

By Thomasine Mastrantoni and Deborah Goldstein, the Link Ladies

While we Link Ladies love apps, this time we'll show you a new way to use Google Classroom. Knowing how many districts have “gone Google,” we want to share with you a way to modify how students engage with Storyworks text. Anytime we can find ways for kids to express what they understand and back it up with text evidence to “prove it,” we go for it...