Build Knowledge on Refugees

By
Allison Friedman

Storyworks’s October/November nonfiction article is on a difficult but deeply important topic: the Syrian refugee crisis. It tells the moving story of two young brothers who leave war-torn Aleppo and make a new home in the United States. After reading the article, your students may have questions about the war in Syria, the plight of refugees, and what they can do to help. Here are four resources that you can use to continue the conversation:

 

Note: Because of the difficulty of the subject matter, we suggest that you preview all of the materials below to make sure you feel comfortable sharing them with your students.

 

TO READ: A background knowledge-building book

TO DO: Small-group discussion

This slim book introduces elementary-age kids to the Syrian war and refugee crisis in simple, straightforward language. Definitions, facts, statistics, and maps are interwoven with the fictional story of a young refugee boy, which helps bring the information to life.

LEARNING TASK: After students have read the book, divide them into small groups of 3-4. Have each group choose one of the discussion prompts at the end of the book to talk about amongst themselves. Then come back together as a class and invite each group to share their thoughts.

 

TO VIEW: Photo slideshows

TO DO: A personal letter

These moving slideshows are the product of a joint project between ABC News and Unicef, in which 50 children living in the world’s largest refugee camp were given digital cameras and invited to document their lives. The resulting photos offer a fascinating glimpse into what it’s like to be a young refugee.

LEARNING TASK: Because the article that accompanies the slideshows is too sophisticated for your students, we suggest viewing the slideshows together as a class rather than letting kids explore on their own. Begin by explaining what a refugee camp is and showing the video that introduces the project. Then click through the slideshows, reading the captions out loud. Afterwards, invite students to write a letter to the young photographers who took the pictures, explaining how the photos made them feel and what they learned from the photos about life in a refugee camp.

 

TO WATCH: A powerful video

TO DO: A research project and brochure

The behind-the-scenes video for our 2016 article “Escape From War,” which is about a young Syrian refugee girl, focuses on the amazing ways that people are helping refugees around the world. Your students will be inspired to get involved.

LEARNING TASK: After watching the video, have students do independent research to find out what other people and organizations are doing to help Syrian refugees. Then have them make an illustrated brochure for their fellow students, explaining what is being done and how kids their age can help. (Students can either create their brochures on paper, or make digital versions with free online programs like Canva.)

 

TO EXPLORE: A striking infographic

TO DO: A paragraph-writing activity

This simple yet powerful infographic from the United Nations Refugee Agency will help students visualize the scale of the refugee crisis.

LEARNING TASK: Have students study the infographic carefully, looking up the definitions of words that are unfamiliar to them. Then have them use the information in the infographic to write a paragraph, in their own words, describing the refugee crisis to someone who might not know about it.

 

I hope these ideas spark further learning and discussion in your classroom about this important topic. And, as always, if you have a great learning extension, we want to hear about it! Get in touch with us anytime.

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