Hello teachers! I wish you could come to our New York offices and listen in on some of our discussions (and share some of the delicious coffee we get across the street). Really, all we talk about is YOU...

We are thrilled to introduce a new Storyworks Jr. adviser from Round Rock, Texas: Alejandro Sifuentes. He is an amazingly passionate dual-language third-grade teacher from Round Rock ISD whose mission is to provide his students and families a better ELL transition than he had growing up. His creative juices led him to develop his own YouTube channel where he posts wonderful videos on key ELA skills to keep his kiddos engaged! We begged him to share his new "Como Usar Storyworks Jr. en Casa" (How to use Storyworks Jr. at home) for families who speak Spanish...

By Anna Starecheski

We knew that Lauren Tarshis's gripping story "Mountain of Fire," about the eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980, would be a home-run for Storyworks Jr. readers. The science of volcanoes is fascinating, and their power is breathtaking. Keep your students engaged with the learning extensions below, and as always, let us know if you came up with any great extensions for one of our stories!

By Anna Starecheski

At Storyworks, we believe the best way to learn grammar is through reading. That’s why we’ve created an approach that allows students to uncover key grammar concepts in the context of our articles and stories. With each issue, they’ll practice a featured grammar skill with our entertaining activities. Below, we've highlighted our suite of offerings to help students learn grammar in context...

By Meg Zucker

We're kicking off a new contest for Storyworks Jr. in our October/November 2017 issue. It's called One of a KIND and it promotes empathy, asking students to write about a time that they were an especially a good friend, or needed one. Who better to tell you more about it than our friend Meg Zucker, who runs an SEL-themed Scholastic contest for 4th-graders nationwide, who herself has physical differences and who is the mom of two sons with physical differences (and a daughter with an "invisible difference"—food allergies)? We hope you'll encourage your students to enter...

By Lauren Tarshis,
Editor, Storyworks

When I wrote "Our World Turned to Water", the nonfiction feature for the September issue of Storyworks, I never imagined that when it came out, millions of people would be facing the aftermath of terrible storms, earthquakes, and wildfires. While this story is about events in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in 2016, I hope you’ll find that the facts and themes will help your students grasp what many Americans have recently experienced, and will inspire your students to want to help in any way they can...